3101 West Adams Boulevard

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Seen above in its last weeks, one of the earliest houses built in the western reaches of West Adams was gone soon after a demolition permit was issued by the Department of Building and Safety on November 11, 1965. Though its lot at the northwest corner of Adams and Arlington has been empty ever since, most of the stone wall surrounding it, if not all, survives. Built by blacksmith and wagon-maker turned real estate investor Andrew Joughin circa 1885, 2301 West Adams Street—as the house was designated  prior to 1912 annexation-related renumberings—went up before Joughin's stake in the Rancho Las Cinegas was within the city limits of Los Angeles. Around the turn of the 20th century, an estate area developed on the sloping, view-rich south side of Adams Street from Manhattan Place westward, when the city's mover and shakers saw only prosperous blue skies ahead for an extending West Adams district.

More on 3101 West Adams Boulevard will appear here in due course.


As seen in December 2014, the original Joughin wall at the south side of the property remains intact, as
do the corner entrance steps to the vanished house. The south wall appears in the image at top
as well. The original east-side wall also appears to remain, covered in concrete.




Illustration: Private Collection; CSUN; GSV